Crafts (20)

Japanese Woodworking Seminar October 31, 2015, Oakland CA

woodworking

Schedule for Kezurou-Kai USA 10/31/2015

  • 9:00-9:15: Karl Bareis: Opening Greeting
  • Ongoing: S. Oyama: Plastering Demonstration
  • 9:15-10:30: Jay Van Arsdale (Part 1): Basic Joinery Cutout Techniques
    • Toby Hargreaves and Mark Van Haltern: Hip Rafter Corner Joinery
    • David Bassing: Sharpening and Blade “Back” Conditioning
  • 10:30-12:00: Jay Van Arsdale (Part 2): High Angle Planing for Difficult Woods
    • Matt Connerton: Chisels or “Nomi-nomics”
    • Ryosei Kaneko (Part 1): Roof Layout and Use of Japanese Square
  • 12:00-1:00: Lunch Break
  • 1:00-2:00: Mike Laine: Planes and Planing
    • Ryosei Kaneko (Part 2): Layout Table and Irregular Timbers
    • Jay Van Arsdale (Part 3): Chisel and Plane Blade Maintenance
  • 2:00-2:20: Karl Bareis: Explanation of Kezurou-Kai USA and 2016 Event
  • 2:30-3:45: Planing Competition
  • 3:45-4:00: Karl Bareis: Closing Remarks
  • … [more in full post] …

$40 entrance fee, $20 students

lumberjocks.com/siavosh/blog/67914

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Yestermorrow School

Yestermorrow Design/Build School

One of the most common questions we get asked is “How do I learn how to build a tiny home?” A very superior answer would be the Yestermorrow School in Waitsfield, Vermont offering over 100 hands-on courses per year in design, construction, woodworking, and architectural craft including a variety of courses concentrating in sustainable design and green building. Yestermorrow is one of the only design/build schools in the country, teaching both design and construction skills. Hands-on courses are taught by top architects, builders, and craftspeople from across the country.
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Making Your Own Knives

When I was at the Mother Earth News Faire in Pennsylvania a few months ago, I bought a handmade knife from a mountain man — a guy who dressed in buckskins and made a variety of hunting, trapping, and outdoor tools. The blade was carbon steel, which I prefer over stainless steel. It’s softer and easier to sharpen, even if you have to care for it so that it doesn’t rust.

He told me that it was a Russell Green River blade, so I tracked it down, and ordered about half a dozen different shaped blades (from TrackOfTheWolf.com); they’re pretty inexpensive, $9-$10 each. I made the first one in the last few days with some manzanita wood I gathered (and dried out) a year or so ago. It’s a bit crude, but I learned a lot and am going to make handles for some paring and skinning knives.

DSC01576-lo-res
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