‍‍‍‍Small Homes (225)

Small Homes Featured in Latest Mother Earth News + 50% Discount on Books for November

The December/January issue of Mother Earth News has a 5-page article on our book, Small Homes.

Note: We are offering a 50% discount on our books Small Homes, Tiny Homes, and Shelter for the rest of November, with free shipping.

Christmas gifts?

Details at: www.shelterpub.com/building

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Primitive Log Cabin Build in Forest



Building a log cabin completely alone has been my dream since selling my last cabin 15 years ago.I start this video by cutting down cedar trees in winter and end with a standing log cabin in the Canadian Wilderness, up to the top of the walls.

In this video, I go into more detail to show exactly how I am doing it. Learn how I cut the notches, lift the logs into place by myself and start preparing my house to live a life like Dick Proenneke did in Alaska.

Get prepared for the apocalypse by building your own primitive off-grid log cabin, tiny house in the woods of wilderness Canada.

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Small Woodland Home in Southwest England

Dear Lloyd,

I became a carpenter and eco builder because of your books. Shelter and HomeWork got me hooked. Builders of the Pacific Coast got me started.

I used to work in an office. Now I build homes (narrowboats, vans, caravans, yurts, cabins) for the customers that want something different but can’t afford hiring “big people.” The poor also have the right to live in a nice home.

I built this 6.5m-diameter, heptagonal, tapered-walled, reciprocal green-roofed yurt, the “reciproyurt,” last year and got more than 70 volunteers involved.

I love working with people without experience. They give any project a freshness that you never get with professionals. They have no real preconceptions — really open-minded. They want to learn but they also teach you so much! They mainly helped with big jobs like raising the frame.

–Jesus Sierra

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Lobelia: The $35,000 Strawbale Home in Missouri

Kitchen, dinning, and living room.

…Lobelia is the name of our 864-square-foot, two-bedroom, straw bale home. Named after a native wildflower, Lobelia was built with many reclaimed materials, including all framing lumber, most doors and windows, and even the kitchen cabinet.

The straw bale exterior walls are protected by earthen plaster inside and out. Outside, the hip roof and wood shingle skirt, made from pallet wood scraps, along with a coat or two or raw linseed oil help protect the exterior plaster from the elements…

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