‍‍‍Tiny Homes (295)

Rob's French Army House Truck

… It’s a 1959 French Army Truck — a Simica Unic Marmon Bocquet (or SUMB). The shack is built with wood from local sawmills, reclaimed bits, corrugated steel, and insulated with sheep wool. Friends Jo House and Charlie Goodvibes helped with the building, which took about three weeks, I hadn’t built anything like this before, but now I feel ready to build anything…

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Eat Dog's Driftwood Beach Shack

Photo by Lloyd Kahn

…Eat Dog built a tiny house in a semi-hidden ravine leading down to the same beach. (I walked on this beach many times in those years and never spotted his shack.) He lived there for about two years, until getting to work as a gardener miles away in the “civilized world” got to be a strain, and he abandoned the place. Soon others moved in, notoriety followed, and it too was confined to a fiery ending…

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Tom's Cabin

It started as a “Tall Barn” prefab kit from Tuff Shed (which has a large selection of pre-fabbed little structures). It was about $4,000 for the structure, exterior walls, roof deck, floor, and floor framing, delivered on a truck. Studs are 2×4’s two feet on center. Exterior walls are ⅜″ particle board with a wood grain pattern. Tom insulated the inside walls and roof with R-11 fiberglass batting, then used ⅜″ CD plywood for sheathing…

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Tiny House Features $500 DIY Elevator Bed Built with Free Plans



The ethos of doing-it-yourself in a resourceful, space-saving way is at the root of the tiny house movement. That said, one of the most amazing things about the tiny house world is observing the immense creative variety within the constraints of these small spaces, all attempting to answer the perennial question, “How can one make the most of a couple hundred square feet?”

These space-maximizing strategies are relevant to many of us, so it’s always enjoyable to come across new ideas, such as the ones implemented in this elegant small dwelling by Alaskan self-taught carpenter, blogger, mom and free-DIY-plans extraordinaire Ana White. Together with her husband Jacob, Ana created a surprisingly spacious 24-foot-long tiny house for a client that is jam-packed with clever, transforming furniture ideas and an affordable DIY “elevator bed”.

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Life in an 82 sq. ft. Apartment



Japan is famous throughout the world for it’s high population, cramped living conditions and downsized architecture. Even by Japanese standards though, this tiny Tokyo apartment is a lot smaller than usual. At only 8 square meters (82 square feet) this simple home is so small that it’s occupant Emma is able to reach out and touch both walls. Thankfully, some clever design elements allows the micro apartment to be a very functional and cosy home.

Despite the narrow, almost hall-like shape, this apartment’s height prevents the space from feeling too confined. Lofty windows at the end of the studio space allow an abundance of light to flow into the room and a small balcony even brings a touch of the outdoors into the home.

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A Well-Designed Tiny Home

The gorgeous hand-built house in question is called Keva Tiny House and it was lovingly designed and built by yoga instructor Rebecca Grim, with some help from her carpenter friend Rudy Hexter and his apprentice Lenny. It is located in the forest on Salt Spring Island, in Canada’s West Coast, and looks like something out of a fairytale.

The home is 22 feet long, and has an indoor area of 168 feet with a 64-square-foot loft. The home also features an 8 ft. by 8 ft. porch made of pallets so it is easy to dismantle and move should the need arise. The porch is covered with a plexiglass roof, which lets in the light and keeps out the rain.

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Family with Three Kids Downsizes to Tiny Home to Gain More Space

fruit-store-gloucestershire

With the birth of their third child and after a summer spent with the whole family traveling in a camper van and volunteering at organic farms, English architect Tim Francis and his wife, teacher Laura Hubbard–Miles, decided to actually downsize. They moved from London and out into the countryside of Gloucestershire, renovating a small, Victorian stone building on Francis’s parents’ property that once stored fruit…

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