‍‍‍Tiny Homes (300)

'>

Master Carpenter in Japan Builds on Wheels



Mr. Tagami follows a principle of organic architecture. He describes his tiny house designs as growing like seeds, each with it’s own life and character. Before constructing a home, he creates scale models to ensure that his concept works and that the home will be aesthetically appealing.

As a man who is conscious of our environmental footprint,  Mr. Tagami strives to use natural materials wherever possible which at the end of the homes life will be able to return to the earth and not become a burden for future generations. Great care is taken in the sourcing of materials to ensure that the home is not only healthy for the earth, but also for those who will live in it…

Post a comment

Tiny Texas Houses

This photo is the cover image on our book, Tiny Homes.

My Mascot, the first house I ever built: a 10′ × 16′ Rustic Texas Cabin, our most popular style. It was picked up in the air and dropped 15 feet over on the edge of a concrete slab in the tornado, one of the reasons we have stainless steel cables that run through the house peak and down for anchoring them now. We only broke one pane of glass in the loft when it was tossed around…

–Brad Kittel
Founder and Owner
Tiny Texas Houses

Post a comment

74K Tiny Home Is Larger than Life

…The exterior of the home offers the first clue that this is more than just a tiny space put together on a whim. The attractive facade is a blend of reclaimed pine heart and cedar with a beautiful weathered, blue stain finish that gives the structure a shabby chic cabin feel. The home’s gabled roof is topped with Onduvilla tiles, which are made with recycled materials.

The interior is as comfortable as it is attractive. Like most tiny homes, the “palace” has a creative layout that maximizes space for the master bedroom, dining room, kitchen, and bathroom. The bedroom has a queen-sized bed with plenty of room to walk around it. The bed converts into two lounge chairs when not in use, and there is a hidden “loft” that can be used as a second bedroom…

Post a comment (2 comments)

Rob's French Army House Truck

… It’s a 1959 French Army Truck — a Simica Unic Marmon Bocquet (or SUMB). The shack is built with wood from local sawmills, reclaimed bits, corrugated steel, and insulated with sheep wool. Friends Jo House and Charlie Goodvibes helped with the building, which took about three weeks, I hadn’t built anything like this before, but now I feel ready to build anything…

Post a comment

Eat Dog's Driftwood Beach Shack

Photo by Lloyd Kahn

…Eat Dog built a tiny house in a semi-hidden ravine leading down to the same beach. (I walked on this beach many times in those years and never spotted his shack.) He lived there for about two years, until getting to work as a gardener miles away in the “civilized world” got to be a strain, and he abandoned the place. Soon others moved in, notoriety followed, and it too was confined to a fiery ending…

Post a comment (1 comment)

Tom's Cabin

It started as a “Tall Barn” prefab kit from Tuff Shed (which has a large selection of pre-fabbed little structures). It was about $4,000 for the structure, exterior walls, roof deck, floor, and floor framing, delivered on a truck. Studs are 2×4’s two feet on center. Exterior walls are ⅜″ particle board with a wood grain pattern. Tom insulated the inside walls and roof with R-11 fiberglass batting, then used ⅜″ CD plywood for sheathing…

Read More …

Post a comment
'>

Tiny House Features $500 DIY Elevator Bed Built with Free Plans



The ethos of doing-it-yourself in a resourceful, space-saving way is at the root of the tiny house movement. That said, one of the most amazing things about the tiny house world is observing the immense creative variety within the constraints of these small spaces, all attempting to answer the perennial question, “How can one make the most of a couple hundred square feet?”

These space-maximizing strategies are relevant to many of us, so it’s always enjoyable to come across new ideas, such as the ones implemented in this elegant small dwelling by Alaskan self-taught carpenter, blogger, mom and free-DIY-plans extraordinaire Ana White. Together with her husband Jacob, Ana created a surprisingly spacious 24-foot-long tiny house for a client that is jam-packed with clever, transforming furniture ideas and an affordable DIY “elevator bed”.

Post a comment (2 comments)
'>

Life in an 82 sq. ft. Apartment



Japan is famous throughout the world for it’s high population, cramped living conditions and downsized architecture. Even by Japanese standards though, this tiny Tokyo apartment is a lot smaller than usual. At only 8 square meters (82 square feet) this simple home is so small that it’s occupant Emma is able to reach out and touch both walls. Thankfully, some clever design elements allows the micro apartment to be a very functional and cosy home.

Despite the narrow, almost hall-like shape, this apartment’s height prevents the space from feeling too confined. Lofty windows at the end of the studio space allow an abundance of light to flow into the room and a small balcony even brings a touch of the outdoors into the home.

Post a comment