Nice Interior Design of a Tiny Home in D.C. by Brian Levy

Interior shot

There are two things that I like about this tiny home:

  • The light coming in from all around — no claustrophobia as with many tiny homes.
  • The bed is not in a cramped loft, as with many tiny homes. (The vertical ladders to these lofts make them doubly poor in design.)

This place is plain and simple on the outside, and thoughtfully laid out on the inside.

Brian Levy is leading his own quiet experiment on a pie-shaped, 5,000-square-foot lot in Northeast Washington. As new homes get larger and larger in many neighborhoods throughout the region, Levy is attempting to prove that less is more.

Levy’s house is 11 feet wide and 22 feet long, with 210 square feet of interior space. The house has a galley kitchen and space to accommodate a small dinner party. It also has a full-size bed — although he can’t sleep overnight there because of a provision in District law.

Still, he hopes his “micro-house” will spark a revolution. He wants to spread the message that owners of tiny houses spend less time on such chores as cleaning and mowing — plus the structures have a relatively minimal impact on the environment. Moreover, small houses cost less to purchase and maintain when affordability is becoming a bigger issue in the District.

“I was looking for designs that are more functional for a wider range of people,” said Levy. “Micro-houses that don’t rely on a loft as a sleeping area could bring affordable housing to more people who are looking for less-expensive housing options.… Older people don’t want to deal with a loft.Š”

Exterior shot

15 Responses to Nice Interior Design of a Tiny Home in D.C. by Brian Levy

  1. George says:

    Like the layout. Curious why you can’t spend the night. That would be more mature people prefer single level.

    • Sue says:

      DC Zoning and Housing laws prohibit it.This is one of the tiny houses in Boneyard Studios, which has received a lot of publicity and interest. Still, no one can stay overnight. Unlikely these will ever be accepted as permanent housing in DC, sad to say.

  2. Sharon Irven says:

    Looks intriguing – I much prefer a main level sleeping area – but does the bed always sit in the middle of the living room floor? Is there a kitchen and bathroom too??

  3. Annette says:

    Not enough content.

  4. Anonymous says:

    ” Beautiful “

  5. Anonymous says:

    where do your clothes go?

  6. That it’s not legally usable as a normal home would ruin it for me.

  7. Evan Kahn says:

    Hopefully the laws are changed to allow overnight stays.

  8. Brian Mullaney says:

    How much did this home cost to build as is?

  9. If you have to live in tiny place you can just embrace it. You can repaint walls in lighter color and the space will look bigger. The main thing is to forget about claustrophobia. I love your work with this little cozy apartment. Best regards!

  10. This is great! The most really has been made of such a small area. The huge windows do not just bring the scenic surroundings inside, but it also adds some much needed light into the room.

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