74K Tiny Home Is Larger than Life

…The exterior of the home offers the first clue that this is more than just a tiny space put together on a whim. The attractive facade is a blend of reclaimed pine heart and cedar with a beautiful weathered, blue stain finish that gives the structure a shabby chic cabin feel. The home’s gabled roof is topped with Onduvilla tiles, which are made with recycled materials.

The interior is as comfortable as it is attractive. Like most tiny homes, the “palace” has a creative layout that maximizes space for the master bedroom, dining room, kitchen, and bathroom. The bedroom has a queen-sized bed with plenty of room to walk around it. The bed converts into two lounge chairs when not in use, and there is a hidden “loft” that can be used as a second bedroom…

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The House-Box

Our home, completely designed, restored and converted by ourselves, is a 7.5-ton 1979 Bedford TK. To the naked eye it looks like a traditional tweedy handmade home, but scratch the surface and there’s enough sustainable technology to enable us to reduce our combined outgoings from £800 (when we lived in our last “house”) to just £20 on LPG!

We have a comprehensive PV solar set-up, powering a 450-amp-hour bank of AGM batteries, on which we run just about anything we want…

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Aunt Lillie's House

Dear Lloyd,

I just want to send you a quick email to let you know that my book came and to thank you so much for including me amongst so many amazing and beautiful homes! I’m really not worthy. The book is beautiful, I love the section on small homes in towns and cities everywhere. It’s true, every town has some small homes, especially if there was a mill. We have lots of old mill towns here in Georgia and near the old mill will be some of the most beautiful small homes. In Atlanta there’s a place called Cabbage Town, where they took the old mill homes and neighborhood and revitalized it. The downside to this is gentrification. I’d like to see or work to achieve revitalization without gentrification. But it’s up to all of us to take care of our things and make the most of what we have.
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Digital Nomad's Minimalist Van



…American builder, entrepreneur and recovering architect Ross Lukeman of Alternative Homes Today is one of these new digital nomads, who lives, works and travels in a minimalist cargo van he converted himself. Lukeman began his journey about five years ago, after having gotten an architecture degree, working for a few years in jobs that paid the bills, but didn’t allow for much freedom for him to explore his own growing interests in alternative housing.

Lukeman began formulating an exit plan into the digital nomad lifestyle: working full-time while working on his own online business for five years, and also building out his van, finally quitting his job a couple of months before completing the build-out…

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Godfrey Stephens' Junk-Rigged Snookwis

…An ancient Nitnat canoe (carved from one cedar tree), which Godfrey rebuilt in the ’70s. It’s sheathed in copper, with an underwater Nautilus window and a tiny stainless steel wood stove; there’s room for two. Tilikum (Godfrey’s daughter) is now the caretaker of the boat and keeps it in Port Townsend, Washington…

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Rob's French Army House Truck

… It’s a 1959 French Army Truck — a Simica Unic Marmon Bocquet (or SUMB). The shack is built with wood from local sawmills, reclaimed bits, corrugated steel, and insulated with sheep wool. Friends Jo House and Charlie Goodvibes helped with the building, which took about three weeks, I hadn’t built anything like this before, but now I feel ready to build anything…

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Eat Dog's Driftwood Beach Shack

Photo by Lloyd Kahn

…Eat Dog built a tiny house in a semi-hidden ravine leading down to the same beach. (I walked on this beach many times in those years and never spotted his shack.) He lived there for about two years, until getting to work as a gardener miles away in the “civilized world” got to be a strain, and he abandoned the place. Soon others moved in, notoriety followed, and it too was confined to a fiery ending…

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Small Homes Now Available

Our new book Small Homes: The Right Size is now available at independent bookstores, and Amazon — as well as from us: www.shelterpub.com/…

Shameless Commerce Dept.: This is, I think, the best building book we’ve ever done. (Yes, I’m sure I’ve said this before, but it keeps reoccurring to me.) Shelter is everyone’s favorite; it captured the times; it inspired thousands of homes. Builders of the Pacific Coast is in some ways, my best book. It’s an odyssey of discovery where the reader rides shotgun with me over a two-year period — cohesive and focused.

BUT Small Homes is so useful to so many people in this era of astronomical home prices and rents, that I think it’s hugely important. It offers alternatives to people looking for rentals on Craigslist or homes on Zillow. Here are 65 very different homes, of different materials, in different parts of the world. The idea, as with all our building books is to use your hands to create your own shelter.

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