Urban Treehouse 63-Unit Apartment Building in Italy

…The undulating structure creates a transition from outdoors to in, holding 150 trees that absorb close to 200,000 liters of carbon dioxide an hour. This natural absorption brings pollution protection to its residents, helping to eliminate harmful gasses caused by cars and harsh sounds from the bustling streets outside. The trees’ seasonal progression also creates the ideal microclimate inside the building, steadying temperature extremes during the cold and warmer months…

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Couple Builds Tiny Home for $17K



Built for only $17,000 this young couple’s tiny house is certainly an incredible achievement. The home, constructed by Asheville, NC couple David and Catherine, was built mostly using reclaimed or recycled materials and is filled with clever design elements to truly make the home their own.

An ideal parking space for the tiny house on wheels has been created in the yard of a home in a quiet neighborhood and the couple have spent time creating an outdoor area to relax and expand the living space of the house while also building gardens to grow some food.

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Timber Owl Cabin in the French Countryside

Imagine hiking through the greenery around Bordeaux, France, and coming upon a magical little house in the shape of three owls. We’re guessing you’d want to stay awhile, and that’s the point. Les Guetteurs (The Watchers) is one of six oddball, off-grid huts in the Refuges Périurbains (Peri-urban shelters), a program intended to draw curious guests to discover new areas on the edge of the city (a similar project has also taken hold just outside of Copenhagen.)

Designed by Candice Pétrillo and constructed by the French workshop Zébra3/Buy-Sellf, the building was made to resemble a group of small, ground-nesting owls that live in the wetlands around the structure. From the exterior, the timber building looks like a huddle of three owls, their eyes made of large round windows and feathers made from long strips of bent plywood and shorter plywood shingles…

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Incredible Tiny House Café is a True Work of Art



Beautiful to behold, this spectacular tiny house café is a remarkable specimen of skilled labour and artistic vision. Chantal and Mike are a truly dynamic duo, one with a dream of starting a boutique coffee shop and the other with a zeal for eco-tiny house building. When these unique passions were combined to create Le Bon Café, a wonderful and rare work of functional art was the result.

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Caravan on Hornby Island, BC

Located in the forest on Hornby Island, this little house on wheels is inhabited by myself, two cats, and a chihuahua. After university, I realized that building a tiny house would be an attainable way to have a private and personally planned living space. Inspired by tiny house creators, I set to work designing the 250 sq. ft. (10 × 25 ft.) space, plus loft. The journey became official upon purchasing a second-hand steel trailer frame. It was towed home from Vancouver Island across two ferries. Because the frame was a little short, an extra 5 ft. were welded onto it.

The design evolved around two main features: an enormous window found on Craigslist and the roof’s curved beams gifted from a local builder. I tried to use and reclaim many recycled items. The live-edge maple cabinet doors came from my childhood home. The cast-iron tub was purchased from a guest house on a neighbouring island. The Pacific Energy wood stove (placed on an old table saw base) was found at the local free store. And all the wooden windows and doors were fixed up, along with much more! While I gathered and refurbished materials, several builders brought the vision to life.

Some unusual building techniques were used during construction. For instance, the studs on the side walls are exposed on the inside, allowing for more width. The S-shaped curve of the loft was constructed by cutting beams in half and joining them back together with one side flipped. I have been living here since September 2016. The next stage will be to build a cedar porch in front of the French doors and expand the garden.

–Sarat Colling


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Godfrey Stephens' New Sculpture

Godfrey just sent this photo. After two day’s work. What a fucking genius! He’s getting better.

His combination of Kwakwaka’wakw training and artistic sensibilities from the depths of his soul produce powerful art. He’s in Builders of the Pacific Coast, Tiny Homes on the Move, and throughout this blog, and has been in my life for over 50 years.

He’s more of an artist — wild, productive, joyous — than the world-famous rich artists out there getting all the attention. He’s a Picasso under the radar.

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SF Couple Build Out Sprinter Van to Live on the Road

The idea of leaving most of your possessions behind to start living (and adventuring) in a van might seem like either a faraway dream or a foolhardy undertaking, depending on who you ask.

Juliana Linder and Richmond Hollen plunged into that nomadic lifestyle after purchasing a 2002 Freightliner Sprinter van.

Before taking off on a yearlong trip in their van-home, the couple spent time saving up and customizing the van. They gave up their apartments in San Francisco in 2016…

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Nonagan Yurt Treehouse



I spent the weekend at Mountain View Air B&B building a canted-wall nonagon yurt treehouse! I worked with SunRay Kelley, Bonnie, Bob-O, and Tyler Smith. This was such a fun project. I spent one weekend helping assemble the walls for the kit; SunRay and his team did the rest during the week; and last weekend, we built the platform and erected the nonagon yurt.

–Travis Skinner

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Eight-Foot-Wide Home in Kobe, Japan

Like Vietnam’s many skinny houses, this 2.5 meter-wide (that’s approximately 8 feet) house in Kobe, Japan, takes advantage of its narrow site and reaches skyward to maximize livable space—and light.

Japanese studio FujiwaraMuro Architects designed the so-called iny House on a 22-square-meter plot (about 237 square feet) to encompass three dynamic floors, a staircase at the rear, and a central void topped with skylights that allows sunlight to filter down through the level.

The 63-square-meter (678 square feet) residence is clad in knotted timber, with the first floor incorporating an opening for a garage, at the rear of which is the main entrance. On this floor are the bathroom (separated into a toilet room, bathtub, shower room, and sink) and sliding-door storage.

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