Family with Three Kids Downsizes to Tiny Home to Gain More Space

fruit-store-gloucestershire

With the birth of their third child and after a summer spent with the whole family traveling in a camper van and volunteering at organic farms, English architect Tim Francis and his wife, teacher Laura Hubbard–Miles, decided to actually downsize. They moved from London and out into the countryside of Gloucestershire, renovating a small, Victorian stone building on Francis’s parents’ property that once stored fruit…

Post a comment
'>

Ness and Jess' Beautiful Home on Wheels



Ness and Jess are two incredible ladies. After moving to New Zealand, they decided to begin their new life in a strange country by building a Tiny House on wheels. With minimal building experience but lots of passion, this dynamic duo has designed and constructed a true tiny masterpiece.

There’s no doubt about it, this tiny house is packed full of great features and industrial design influence. Much of that character is testament to the couples resourcefulness, repurposing skill and eye for a good bargain.

Elements such as the exposed structural steel beams that have been interwoven with LED rope lights help the home to not only build a bold impression but also somehow warms the raw nature of the materials and makes the cold steel feel like a cosy character piece for the home…
Read More …

Post a comment

New Yorkers Making the Most of the Tiny House Trend

More than 10 million viewers tuned in to HGTV’s tiny-house shows this year. There’s a Tiny House magazine, at least two documentaries and countless blogs about tiny-house living.

“Part of the surprise is that it has resonated with urban viewers — the majority of whom are already living in tiny spaces,” said John Feld, senior vice president of programming and production at HGTV.

And while tiny studios are common in NYC, 1987 zoning restrictions meant new-build apartments could be no smaller than 400 sq. ft. But in 2012, a waiver was passed allowing for one building of “micro-units,” measuring between 260 and 360 sq. ft. The ribbon on those 55 units was officially cut in October.

Post a comment

A Lovely LDV Camper

lily-and-her-van-4-of-8

When we first met Lily Loveheart Kemp, she was living in an incredible pop-top caravan that she had renovated and which was parked in a backyard in the middle of Auckland City, New Zealand. The following winter, she packed her bags and began an incredible journey.

Her time living in the pop-top caravan certainly taught Lily a lot about small-space design and what was required to really make a tiny house on wheels into a comfortable home. The final result of her design project was a spectacularly renovated van, perfectly suited for a young couple on the road. Traveling to the United Kingdom and together with her partner Ryan, converting an LDV van into a brilliant home on wheels, which they would live in while traveling around Europe.

Despite the limited size afforded by an LDV van, this home certainly isn’t doing without much. It boasts a full kitchenette (borrowed from an old caravan) with sink, gas fridge, two hobs, a workspace and plenty of storage for all the kitchen essentials. There’s also additional over-cab storage, a wardrobe, cassette toilet, leisure battery, full-length windows, a carpeted area for the bedroom, vinyl flooring in the kitchen, and even a well-insulated ceiling. The entire van is designed to run off electrical hook-ups and gas but the leisure battery is large enough for some unplugged adventures.

Post a comment

My America

trips

On a trip to Nevada, Utah, and Arizona in 1989

This political nightmare we’ve been going through for some months now may have led me to choosing the subject for my next book.

I’ve been trying to figure out what to do after Small Homes:

  • 50 Years of Natural Building
  • A book on my trips
  • A book on barns

Some kind of context for the 10,000+ photos I’ve taken over the years.

The idea about a book on the U.S.A. popped into my head a few days ago. This would be my version of America. It would start with me riding the rails and hitchhiking from San Francisco to New York in 1965, along with a copy of Ouspensky’s In Search of the Miraculous — seeking enlightenment, if you will, trying to figure out what to do with the rest of my life — as the cultural revolution of the ’60s–’70s unfolded. (Upon return a month later, I quit my job as an insurance broker and went to work as a builder.)

I would show the America that I love, the people in every state who were kind and friendly and helpful, Pop’s Diner in Page, Arizona; pressmen at Courier Printing in Kendallville, Indiana; squirrel hunters in Tennessee; the waitress in an Oklahoma diner serving me coconut cream pie with coffee at 2:30 AM; farmers, surfers, skateboarders, lawyers, and bankers (yes — there are some good ones); book lovers, musicians, builders; makers…

This just may be the next book: the glass-half-full take on America.

Post a comment (7 comments)

Small Homes Book Sneak Preview #25, Solar-Powered Quonset Hut Home in Northern California

p7150830-lo-res

p7150849Elaine and Sandy Doss live on 150 acres in Northern California in this WWII Quonset hut, which was converted for living by architect Val Agnoli (one of the featured builders in our book, Shelter).

Sandy and I continue to live off the grid using a photovoltaic system with backup gas generator. Water comes from a well with solar pump, then gravity-fed to the house; livestock water is from springs.

We have a bedroom wood-burning stove, living-room propane fireplace, and propane wall heater in the study. TV and Internet services are via satellite.

–Elaine Doss

Post a comment (1 comment)

Which Cover Do You Like Best?

Rick and I are in the final stages of preparing Small Homes for the printers. We changed the cover from an earlier version, which showed a small turn-of-the-century home in Santa Cruz (in this revised cover, it’s the middle image in the left hand column), because a single image didn’t seem to represent the diversity of images (120 or so small homes) in the book. Hence the collage.

Below are two alternatives, the same except for the background color. In the one with the red, it’s similar-looking to Home Work, Builders of the Pacific Coast, and Tiny Homes on the Move. Some of our savvy book friends think it’s too similar, and that another color would distinguish it from the other books. Hence the other with the dark green background.

Comments, please. Which do you like? Do you see any problem in this cover being similar to our other books?

smh-frontcover_v5-lo-ressmh-frontcover_v6-dark-green-lo-res

Post a comment (23 comments)