Building (383)

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Digital Nomad's Minimalist Van



…American builder, entrepreneur and recovering architect Ross Lukeman of Alternative Homes Today is one of these new digital nomads, who lives, works and travels in a minimalist cargo van he converted himself. Lukeman began his journey about five years ago, after having gotten an architecture degree, working for a few years in jobs that paid the bills, but didn’t allow for much freedom for him to explore his own growing interests in alternative housing.

Lukeman began formulating an exit plan into the digital nomad lifestyle: working full-time while working on his own online business for five years, and also building out his van, finally quitting his job a couple of months before completing the build-out…

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Godfrey Stephens' Junk-Rigged Snookwis

…An ancient Nitnat canoe (carved from one cedar tree), which Godfrey rebuilt in the ’70s. It’s sheathed in copper, with an underwater Nautilus window and a tiny stainless steel wood stove; there’s room for two. Tilikum (Godfrey’s daughter) is now the caretaker of the boat and keeps it in Port Townsend, Washington…

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Rob's French Army House Truck

… It’s a 1959 French Army Truck — a Simica Unic Marmon Bocquet (or SUMB). The shack is built with wood from local sawmills, reclaimed bits, corrugated steel, and insulated with sheep wool. Friends Jo House and Charlie Goodvibes helped with the building, which took about three weeks, I hadn’t built anything like this before, but now I feel ready to build anything…

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Tom's Cabin

It started as a “Tall Barn” prefab kit from Tuff Shed (which has a large selection of pre-fabbed little structures). It was about $4,000 for the structure, exterior walls, roof deck, floor, and floor framing, delivered on a truck. Studs are 2×4’s two feet on center. Exterior walls are ⅜″ particle board with a wood grain pattern. Tom insulated the inside walls and roof with R-11 fiberglass batting, then used ⅜″ CD plywood for sheathing…

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Cob House Wrapped in a Geodesic Dome in the Arctic Circle

Life inside the Arctic Circle is by no means easy, unless you’re a Hjertefølger. We first heard about Benjamin and Ingrid Hjertefølger four years ago when they began building Nature House, a three-story cob house wrapped in a solar geodesic dome. Located on the island of Sandhornøyna in northern Norway, the ultra-green home was designed to enable the family of six to eek out a sustainable existence despite challenging climatic conditions — they even grow most of their own food. Inhabitat recently caught up with the Hjertefølgers, who have now lived in their home for three years, to learn about their challenges and victories.

The Hjertefølgers, which translates to Heartfollowers, live in Nature House with their four children — they’ve added one to their number since Inhabitat last wrote about them. After constructing their cob home topped with one of Solardome’s single-glazed geodesic domes with the help of friends and neighbors, the family moved in on December 8, 2013.

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Beautifully Built Cargo Van Conversion

New technologies like smart devices, compact computers and the ubiquity of Wi-Fi are allowing more and more people to work when and wherever they want. When combined with an array of solar photovoltaics — which are getting smaller and cheaper by the day — one can create a setup that can allow one to work and to travel almost anywhere in the world.

So it makes sense that we’re seeing a slew of young people going the digital nomad route, whether it’s in a co-working space abroad, or in a vehicle that’s been converted into a full-time live-and-work space. Moreover, the recent explosion of knowledge-sharing and DIY culture in online blogs and videos makes these conversions all the more accessible to complete novices. Designboom introduces us to Hungarian freelance photographer Norbert Juhász, who fits in the latter category, having adapted an old, nondescript white cargo van into a minimalist home for himself and his fiancée, Dora, a writer.

Juhász, who has also studied architecture, wanted something different from the hustle and bustle of downtown Budapest. Having met six years ago, the couple recently decided to go the route of full-time “#vanlife”, as travelling affords new, stimulating experiences, but also plenty of photographic opportunities. Juhász specifically bought this 16-year-old van (now called Debella) last spring as it doesn’t draw too much attention, meaning less hassle if one has to park somewhere for the night.

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Homestead of Recycled Materials in Quebec

…In the fall of 2008 we came across an opportunity to pick up pine trees that were locally cut. We adapted our plans to the amount of wood available.

We hired a local sawmill owner to cut the timbers for us. That winter we rented a shop and prebuilt a 24′×30′ timber frame of 9′×9′ pine. The joinery is mortise-and-tenon, sculpted with mallet and chisels…

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