Greenhouse (16)

Free Farm Land in Ontario, Canada

If you love animals, are prepared to work hard and long for the bucolic lifestyle, Stephen Overbury has a proposition for you.

Overbury is looking for someone to take over his farm near Smiths Falls, Ont., as he prepares to return to Japan, where he had lived for about 15 years.

But instead of selling it or renting it out, the 62-year-old is offering it up to the right person, in perpetuity — and it won’t cost a dime to take it over.

“[Selling] is conventional thinking, the prudent way of thinking about yourself and what’s best for yourself,” Overbury told CBC News on Friday.

“By selling the farm, first I’d have to dispose of the animals. And a number of them are older, and a few are special-needs. And that’s what I call reckless abandonment.”

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Cob House Wrapped in a Geodesic Dome in the Arctic Circle

Life inside the Arctic Circle is by no means easy, unless you’re a Hjertefølger. We first heard about Benjamin and Ingrid Hjertefølger four years ago when they began building Nature House, a three-story cob house wrapped in a solar geodesic dome. Located on the island of Sandhornøyna in northern Norway, the ultra-green home was designed to enable the family of six to eek out a sustainable existence despite challenging climatic conditions — they even grow most of their own food. Inhabitat recently caught up with the Hjertefølgers, who have now lived in their home for three years, to learn about their challenges and victories.

The Hjertefølgers, which translates to Heartfollowers, live in Nature House with their four children — they’ve added one to their number since Inhabitat last wrote about them. After constructing their cob home topped with one of Solardome’s single-glazed geodesic domes with the help of friends and neighbors, the family moved in on December 8, 2013.

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Island Earth GMO Documentary

Right now the islands of Hawaii are in a food fight of global consequence. Although Hawaii has a rich history as a self-sufficient agricultural society, Hawaiians now import 90% of their food. Hawaii is also ground zero for the world’s biotech companies, which capitalize on the tropical climate and lax environmental laws to test experimental GMO crops year-round.

Island Earth is a feature documentary depicting the struggles and triumphs of people fighting to take back their natural resources from corporations, while exploring what it will really take to “feed the world” through thought-provoking interviews with the world’s top biologists and farmers. By exposing the myth that industrial agriculture is the only way of producing food for our growing population, Island Earth shows how to take control of our food supply through local farming and native wisdoms…

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Home in a Greenhouse

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When it gets cold and dark during the winter months, people find creative ways to stay warm, from the common-sense approach of wearing layers to more wacky ideas like setting up a tent — indoors — to cut down on the heating bill.

But perhaps one of the most unusual approaches we’ve come across is building a greenhouse around your existing home to heat it up. That’s exactly what this family did near Stockholm, Sweden, by renovating an existing summer home and adding a greenhouse structure outfitted with 4-millimetre single-pane glass around it.

From www.treehugger.com/…

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Green Bridge Farm: Going Green from the Ground Up

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Michael Maddox has been reading Mother Earth News since he was in high school, and has always wanted the lifestyle described in its pages. Now in his 60s, he’s reached a point where not only can he bring that dream to fruition, but he can also share it with others.

His strong desire to “think globally, act locally” is why he decided to subdivide part of the farm that’s been in his family since 1798. He received approval for his subdivision from the county zoning commission in 2008, and soon began selling 1.2- to 1.6-acre plots on 25 wooded acres in Effingham County, Georgia. Unlike many subdivisions where McMansions are the prevailing aesthetic, Green Bridge Farm sets maximum square footage and heights, and requires that 90 percent of each site remains wooded. The subdivision has an organic farm at its center.

www.motherearthnews.com/…

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Mark & Meg's Half-Acre California Coastal Farm

On which they grow 60-70% of all their own food.

I’m going to post sneak previews of our next book, Small Homes, once in a while, as I proceed with layout. There will be 6 pages with photos of Mark and Meg’s home, built out of recycled wood, and garden.

I’m experimenting with Twitter to post references to other websites; it’s quicker than blogging. www.twitter.com/lloydkahn

Post from: www.lloydkahn.com/…

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Most Useful Tools for a Half-Acre Homestead

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Summon the word “homestead” and you likely think of hardy farmers with 10 or more acres on which they keep livestock, grow and preserve a great deal of their own food, and fell trees to build their homes. But more modest-sized homesteads are more attainable for most people, and these smaller-scale acreages can embody old-school homesteading in principle, if not in scope. Our half-acre homestead is one of those. Following are some of the most useful tools and techniques that have made Lesley’s and my 40-year journey toward greater self-sufficiency possible.

www.motherearthnews.com/…

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This Crop of Women Farmers Is Stepping Up to Sustain the Land

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Last year, all five of the first-year apprentices at Soil Born Farms’ headquarters near Sacramento, California were women. Another young woman, Elle Huftill-Balzer, was the boss of them all, the farm manager. “It [was] a total girl-power year around here,” says Janet Whalen Zeller, co-founder and co-director of Soil Born Farms Urban Agriculture and Education Project, which oversees two farms totaling 56 acres. In fact, during the past few years the majority of apprenticeship applicants at the farm have been women.

Check out the article at www.civileats.com/…

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The Table Top Farm Stand

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Hi, Lloyd!

As you requested, here is a small photo of my newest farm stand in downtown Pt. Reyes and also the farm stand up at my main plot at 37 Cypress in Pt. Reyes. My friend Justin Goldwater and I built both of the stands and Justin designed and oversaw construction on them. He is really a big fan of yours and actually before we started the design process for this last farm stand in downtown, I sent him your book Builders of the Pacific Coast for inspiration! So there is some of that in the design.
Read More …

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Fresh Food in Detroit Gas Station Convenience Stores

If I were a young person nowadays, wanting to settle down and create my own shelter, I might not seek the ever-more difficult-to-find sylvan homestead in the countryside, but take a good look at Detroit (or other cities), with its thousands of abandoned, fix-up-able houses and ventures such as this one:

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If you’re on the hunt for a fresh, ready-to-eat meal in Detroit, the best place to find it just might surprise you. Take the Sunoco station on Fort Street or the Victory Liquor and Food store on Warren Avenue. Amidst the Hot Cheetos and snack-sized Chips Ahoy cookies, you’ll find a cooler stocked with everything from fresh fruit and yogurt parfaits and spicy feta and hummus wraps to Thai chicken salads made with fresh, green lettuce — not the wilted iceberg you might expect.

The company behind the food might not be what you’d expect either. Fresh Corner Cafe (FCC) is a mission-driven food and delivery service with the goal of making healthy food accessible to all Detroiters. To do this, they’ve turned to a most unlikely distribution center — neighborhood convenience stores…

Article at www.civileats.com/…

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Lloyd Kahn and His Greenhouse

Art Rogers Family Album, November 6, 2014 | The Point Reyes Light

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Lloyd Kahn and his greenhouse built from recycled windows and handmade bricks made from local clay. Photo by Art Rogers

Lloyd, who was born and raised in San Francisco, began building things in the late 1940s when, at age 12, he helped his father construct their family home in Colusa. After building a large timber home for himself from recycled materials in Big Sur in 1967, he became interested in domes and began his publishing career with a series of publications titled Dome Book 1 and Dome Book 2; he became the “Shelter” editor in 1969 for the Whole Earth Catalogue. He moved to Bolinas in 1971, built a dome, tore it down and replaced it with a stud-framed house and became a pioneer of owner-built simple structures using recycled materials. He has since published over 20 books on the subject, including  Shelter, and The Septic System Owners Manual, Builders of the Pacific Coast, and Tiny Homes: Simple Shelter.

He will be giving a slide presentation and book signing this Friday, November 7, 2014, 7:30 p.m., at the Point Reyes Presbyterian Church for his latest book about living in small structures, titled Tiny Homes on the Move: Wheels and Water.

For more information, visit www.pointreyesbooks.com.

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