Natural Materials (299)

Eight-Foot-Wide Home in Kobe, Japan

Like Vietnam’s many skinny houses, this 2.5 meter-wide (that’s approximately 8 feet) house in Kobe, Japan, takes advantage of its narrow site and reaches skyward to maximize livable space—and light.

Japanese studio FujiwaraMuro Architects designed the so-called iny House on a 22-square-meter plot (about 237 square feet) to encompass three dynamic floors, a staircase at the rear, and a central void topped with skylights that allows sunlight to filter down through the level.

The 63-square-meter (678 square feet) residence is clad in knotted timber, with the first floor incorporating an opening for a garage, at the rear of which is the main entrance. On this floor are the bathroom (separated into a toilet room, bathtub, shower room, and sink) and sliding-door storage.

Post a comment
'>

School Bus Converted into Incredible Off-Grid Home



This school but to tiny home conversion could easily be one of the most impressive we have seen so far. When standing inside this home, it’s hard to believe that you’re actually in a vehicle! That’s largely thanks to some great design mixed with skillful execution of the conversion, which involved raising the roof by an additional two feet and cleverly shaping it to feel more like a house.

One of the things that I like most about the idea of a bus conversion compared to a traditional tiny house on wheels, is that they are designed to sustain long-term travel and life on the road. This home in particular is fitted with lots of off-the-grid features including ample solar power, water storage and propane to enable the family to live for extended periods while adventuring in remote locations…

Post a comment
'>

Young Woman Escapes Crazy Rent with a Tiny House



Increasing rent princes in many cities are encouraging young adults to search for housing alternatives. For Jackie Kemp of Denver, Colorado that alternative came in the form of a tiny house on wheels. Now 23 years old, the budding entrepreneur who lives in the tiny house together with her tiny hound (a chihuahua named Darla) is already well on her way to debt-free home ownership.

Jackie’s tiny home fits in perfectly to it’s country surroundings. It’s situated on a large, rural property where she also keeps her horses. The home allows her to be in an ideal position where she can be around her animals, yet also is in close commuting distance to work…

Post a comment (2 comments)

Cool Shacks in the High Sierra

Hi Lloyd & crew,

I thought you might like these photos for your blog these were taken in the East High Sierras near Big Pine, CA. This group of shacks houses a pack train that carries tourists up to see a glacier, though no animals were present when I walked by.

They have the delightful “architect-less” simplicity you often see in Alpine structures, seated so well within their environment; William Wurster would be delighted. Note the vertical lift door of the hay barn which is opened with a pulley.

Keep up the good work!

–Andy Asp,
Oakland, CA

Post a comment

Mystery of the Gypsy Vardo Solved

Lloyd posted this post a little over a year ago; we just received a letter from the builder, Cennydd Rees, with a little info about his build:

Hi Lloyd,

Just to solve the lovely little mystery on your blog, ’tis I, Cennydd Rees. It’s my little bowtop hybrid or camping karutsa. I live with my Bulgarian girlfriend and two children in an equally tiny house in northwest Bulgaria. I am a designer/builder and am now making a much tighter version of the karutsa in your blog.

Just had two families staying here. One a surfer/designer friend doing a Euro tour with his family in his converted van. The karutsa is a subtle twist on the standard gypsy-style wagons, and I am hoping to make a small living with the now mk3 version. Just enough.
Read More …

Post a comment (1 comment)

Island Soul

I don’t see any boards, but these guys gotta be surfers. Somewhere in Kapa‘a, Kauai. Authentic, yeah?

What I like here (aside from the soulfulness):

  • Hip roof, corrugated steel sheets
  • Porch area by subtraction. Think of it as the overall simple roof shape; then by moving walls inside, you get porch.
  • Up off ground on simplest of foundations.
  • Colors: red/green. I love the brick red color, especially window trim on Pacific west coast.

Post a comment (1 comment)

Learn to Timber Frame Book Review

Will Beemer of The Heartwood School for the Homebuilding Crafts was kind enough to send us this amazing book on learning to build using the timber framing technique. I have always been amazed by this particular process of framing, watched a ton of YouTube videos on builds using this technique, but never really understood the process fully.

I now know about wood selection, the tools needed, layout and cutting, framing, sills, joists, braces, etc. This book gave me a great starting point for using timber frame building techniques. Thank you so much Will! Can’t wait to start a project!

Post a comment