Off the Grid (181)

Custom Sauna by Travis Skinner and Marc Goodson

The Steam Roller is a custom collaboration project with Marc Goodson of Engaging Environments. Marc is a very talented carpenter and welder and he visited me in Olympia to see the Snail Shell Sauna. We decided to collaborate on another sauna that was his main design in his shop in Portland, Oregon. Over the past few months we have met for a few days at a time and chipped away on all the details. After a lot of on and off work we spent Easter weekend jacking up the sauna and getting it on to a trailer and out of Marc’s shop!

What to do with this beautiful sauna? We are not entirely sure. It has been a terrific project and we hope to use it to showcase our work and potentially find a buyer. I think Marc is a bit attached to this sauna, but for the right price he could be convinced to let it go. For now it will live outside of his shop in Tyler Smith’s yard, but if you have any interest in seeing this building or taking a sweat, don’t hesitate to contact either Marc or me.

–Travis Skinner

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The Nest

Hi, Lloyd,

Thank you so much for all your inspirational work, your books, and thoughts.

You have been filling my passed father’s role as a motivational teacher for the last decade. A simple image of your kitchen was enough to make me reach out. Ten years ago my young family acquired 6 amazing acres of land in South Australia. It had a small cabin with solar light still glowing from the last owner and lined with insulating corks.

Ever since I learned of the stability of the Earth’s temperature 6 feet down, my dream has been to build a earth-integrated home. This is what I have done, slowly, by hand, using the earth, rock, and free or cheap materials. A living earth roof, earth and kangaroo-poo floors, off-grid solar system, well water, incredible wildlife, no debt. And a Vitruvian chill space — what more could you ask for?

If you are ever in Australia, drop by.

Cheers and thank you,
–Will

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Long House by Bruno Atkey

Bruno built this 30′×50′ building on a remote beach belonging to the Hesquiat tribe in British Columbia in 1999. It’s used in a “rediscovery” program, and now run by Hooksum Outdoor School, which educates young First Nations people about their history and heritage.

The entire building was framed with beach­combed logs — posts, beams, and purlins. Roofing is 3′-long split-cedar shakes; siding is also split cedar — 1×12’s and 1×15’s six to twelve feet long(!). His crew was mostly from the Hesquiat tribe…

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The Homes Kate Dodd Built

Kate Dodd built two off-the-grid houses in the Northern California woods in the early ’70s. She and her partner started the house in spring of 1972 and moved in that winter (with one wall covered with plastic sheeting).

The foundation was concrete piers. The pole frame was spiked to the piers with a vertical piece of 1″ galvanized pipe. For the attached greenhouse she poured a perimeter foundation…

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