Tiny Homes Book (35)

Inspired by Shelter in 1973

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Hi, Lloyd,

On first looking into your Shelter book in 1973, my fate was sealed. Since then, I have made my own ceramic tile, been a tile setter for 35 years, and am a serial remodeler and builder of tiny houses. Pictured here with my original Shelter book. I recently came upon your Tiny Homes: Simple Shelter, and have been inspired anew. Rage on!

Sincerely,
–Fred Ross
San Anselmo, CA

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Mike Basich's Tiny House Adventure

I met Mike B. when we started working on the Tiny Homes and Tiny Homes on the Move books. Amazing builder, snowboarder, traveller. This guy does it all, one of the most inspiring people I know. Here is a newly released video by GoPro and him detailing the build and trip to Alaska.

www.241-usa.com

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French Carpenters Stop by Shelter on Their Way Home

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Yogan and Menthé, carpenters from France, who have been featured in our last two books, stopped by here yesterday on their way home. They have spent the last three months hitchhiking and working on the West Coast, from Northern California up to Orcas Island. Kindred spirits, these two have had a wonderful time, working with a variety of people, trading work for room and board.

We’ll be posting photos of their projects in the near future.

From www.lloydkahn.com/…

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Brad Kittel's Kickstarter Campaign

Brad Kittel from the Tiny Homes book (pages 44-49 and on the cover) has started a Kickstarter campaign for a book of plans for 30 houses built of 95% salvaged materials free of plastic, vinyl, sheetrock, or latex paints. Check it out.

Kickstarter: www.kickstarter.com/projects/318443601/tiny-texas-houses-building-plans

Nine years ago I began pioneering the 95% Pure Salvage Building techniques that have been perfected over the years in the form of Tiny Texas Houses. They are now built using “Space Magic,” a term I coined for making spaces seem much bigger than they are through illusions of a sort few others in the tiny house industry seem to understand. Read More …

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Texas Tiny Home Builder Wants to Help People Start Salvaged Material Tiny Home Companies

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(Brad Kittel shot the cover photo of Tiny Homes, and his work with local designs and recycled materials is featured on six pages (pp. 44-49) of that book.)

The creator of Tiny Texas Houses and Pure Salvage Living wants to help people start tiny house companies that use salvaged building materials.

If you’ve been looking for an opportunity to build a green business that reuses and repurposes existing resources, that has the potential to help solve a very real issue for many people (high housing costs), and that capitalizes on the popularity of tiny houses, you may want to jump on this offer.

Brad Kittel, one of the pioneers of the tiny house movement who has focused his efforts on building tiny homes almost completely from salvaged building materials, is looking for a dozen or so people (or groups) who want to start their own version of his business in their area, and he’s willing to jumpstart the process by supplying “a giant stock” of materials, as well as offer his guidance to the project.

Kittel lays out the case for establishing what he calls Pure Salvage Outposts, which would build and supply tiny houses according to the building standard set by his business (using 95% salvaged materials in the builds, and using as few new or imported materials as possible), across the country, on his blog: www.puresalvageliving.com/…

Full article: www.treehugger.com/…

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Jay Nelson's Suzuki Camper Built for Foster Huntington

Jay Nelson’s work has been featured in Tiny Homes and Tiny Homes on the Move. Foster Huntington’s Toyota Tacoma camper was featured in Tiny Homes on the Move.

Camper completed

From Foster:

The car is a Suzuki SJ410. It’s the predecessor to the Samurai and has a 1-liter 4-cylinder enqgine.

The camper is made out of marine plywood and thin copper sheeting. The camper has a sleeping space that’s just over 6 feet long over the cab.

Jay Nelson designed and built the camper in two weeks with some help from some friends.

From www.lloydkahn.com/…

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French Carpenter Seeking Work in California/Oregon/Washington This Summer

Yogan is an accomplished timber framer (and treehouse builder) from France. His work has appeared in our last two books. He will be traveling along the West Coast this summer and wants to hook up with builders, homeowners, homesteaders, and/or people of like interests. He’s open to any kind of arrangement, including working for room and/or board.

IMGP6230You can check out his work here: yogan.over-blog.com

From Yogan:

Hi, friend builders, carpenters, inventors…

I’m Yogan, a carpenter of Southwest France,

I’m coming in August, September and October to walk on the West Coast, from California to Seattle. My goal is to meet, visit, help, places and people where there are amazing shelters, cabins — in the woods, if possible.

If I could find a community of carpenters living in cabins in the forest, it would be perfect!

I’d also like to go to any carpenters’ or timber framers’ meetings.

I will be hitchhiking frequently with my backpack and accordion!

You can email me at: Yogan Carpenter <yogancarpenter@gmail.com>

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Off-Grid Straw Bale Cabin in Kentucky Foothills

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Ziggy was featured in Tiny Homes.

Hiya Shelter folks:

I wanted to share a little update about a project we’re working on. We’ve been helping friends build a small, octagonal off-grid cabin here in the Appalachian foothills, outside of Berea, Kentucky. The structure is a post-and-beam frame, and the stemwall is made of earthbags (which we’re currently working on — see my attached photo). In July, we’re hosting a week-long Straw Bale Workshop to build the walls and plaster them with local clay. This is a very comprehensive course for anyone interested in all of the finer points of building with straw bales.

Eventually, the home will have a cob wall with built-in stairs to a loft, a reclaimed brick floor, a small-mass heater and a tiny solar system, just enough for a few lights and very basic electric needs. Exciting stuff.

Well, I thought your Shelter Blog readers might be interested to hear about our workshop. Let me know what you think!

Here is a link to the course: www.theyearofmud.com/natural-building-workshops/straw-bale-workshops/

–Ziggy
Brian ‘Ziggy’ Liloia
Natural Building Workshops & More at The Year of Mud
www.theyearofmud.com

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Artist's Tiny Home in the Woods

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Cathy Johnson was also featured in Tiny Homes.

When Cathy Johnson decided in the 1980s that she needed a quiet retreat, she got to work building a 224-square-foot cabin with her own hands and a little help from a carpenter. Her tiny cabin in the woods sits on 18 acres about 30 miles outside her home in Excelsior Springs, Missouri, outside of Kansas City. “I wanted privacy and this is a perfect spot,” Cathy says.

www.communitytable.com/…

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Top 5 Best Tiny House Books

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We don’t mean to brag, but according to Heavy.com, Shelter Publications has two of the top 5 best tiny house books:

The Tiny House Movement is growing rapidly in the United States. There are a lot of cultures around the world who have already discovered the greater simplicity, freedom and happiness that comes from minimizing your “stuff” load and living in a small home. In the U.S., though, the trend for years has been toward McMansions and the “more is more” philosophy: more space, more stuff, more debt, more hours at work, the list can go on and on. The Tiny House Movement provides an outlet and an alternative for people looking to have more creative control over their living spaces and, in turn, their lives. These five books are a good starting place if you are interested in tiny homes and want to learn more, are looking for some inspiration and ideas, or if you are an experienced tiny house dweller or builder.
Read More …

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